A Realistic Look at Email Security

Like any locked door, chest or vault, some things can be more secure than others. Enterprises need to know where and how to apply email encryption for maximum data protection. 

While some email data security products may offer a built-in encryption feature as part of a larger bundle, there are extensions you should consider that further protect your brand, business and customers.

Here are some ways to add some more muscle to your email data protection efforts:

Covers every scenario

Whether you’re sending millions of e-statements or just sending a sensitive document, not every encrypted message is the same. Look for an encryption platform which offers a customizable user experience for both senders and recipients. People do not come in a one-size-fits-all version.

Personalization

If your organization operates internationally, there’s a high chance that English might not be the mother tongue of some of your customers. Offering encrypted communications in the language of your users helps eliminate confusion and is just good customer service. With Echoworx OneWorld, for example, you can set language policies which can automatically be applied to encrypted communications based on sender, brand, locale or receiver attributes.

Keep email protection simple

Encryption may be hot but the use of it still isn’t. Echoworx found that only 40 per cent of organizations who have encryption capabilities are actually using them throughout their organization. Making data protection in email a consistent path of least resistance is a good non-intrusive way of getting everyone, inside and outside, to communicate securely.

More secure ways to send emails

With traditional secure message delivery, where TLS is used, if a TLS connection isn’t available or supported at the receiving end, there are only two outcomes: receiving an error or sending a message unprotected. Supporting multiple secure delivery methods offers effective fallback options – ensuring sensitive information is always able to be sent and is never sent unprotected.

Prevent unauthorized access

While a one-time-password encryption method is secure, the password itself is only as secure is where it is sent. In other words, if both the one-time-password and the encrypted message are sent to the same mailbox, there’s a lot of trust being put into the security of a recipient’s device or email inbox. A natural solution to this issue would be to send the password to the sender, who can then communicate it as they please to the recipient.

By Derek Christiansen, Engagement Manager, Echoworx